Results of International Sevens.

SeriesSeasonRdsChampionSecondThirdFourthFifthSixth
I1999–0010
New Zealand

(186 pts)

Fiji

Australia

Samoa

South Africa

Canada
II2000–019
New Zealand

(162 pts)

Australia

Fiji

Samoa

South Africa

Argentina
III2001–0211
New Zealand

(198 pts)

South Africa

England

Fiji

Australia

Samoa
IV2002–03 7 [a]
New Zealand

(112 pts)

England

Fiji

South Africa

Australia

Samoa
V2003–048
New Zealand

(128 pts)

England

Argentina

Fiji

South Africa

Samoa
VI2004–057
New Zealand

(116 pts)

Fiji

England

South Africa

Argentina

Australia
VII2005–068
Fiji

(144 pts)

England

South Africa

New Zealand

Samoa

Argentina
VIII2006–078
New Zealand

(130 pts)

Fiji

Samoa

South Africa

England

Wales
IX2007–088
New Zealand

(154 pts)

South Africa

Samoa

Fiji

England

Argentina
X2008–098
South Africa

(132 pts)

Fiji

England

New Zealand

Argentina

Kenya
XI2009–108
Samoa

(164 pts)

New Zealand

Australia

Fiji

England

South Africa
XII2010–118
New Zealand

(166 pts)

South Africa

England

Fiji

Samoa

Australia
XIII2011–129
New Zealand

(167 pts)

Fiji

England

Samoa

South Africa

Australia
XIV2012–139
New Zealand

(173 pts)

South Africa

Fiji

Samoa

Kenya

England
XV2013–149
New Zealand

(180 pts)

South Africa

Fiji

England

Australia

Canada
XVI2014–159
Fiji

(164 pts)

South Africa

New Zealand

England

Australia

United States
XVII2015–1610
Fiji

(181 pts)

South Africa

New Zealand

Australia

Argentina

United States
XVIII2016–1710
South Africa

(192 pts)

England

Fiji

New Zealand

United States

Australia
XIX2017–1810
South Africa

(182 pts)

Fiji

New Zealand

Australia

England

United States
XX2018–1910
Fiji

(186 pts)

United States

New Zealand

South Africa

England

Samoa
XXI2019–20 6 [b]
New Zealand

(115 pts)

South Africa

Fiji

Australia

England

France
XXII2021 2 [c]
South Africa

(40 pts)

Great Britain

Kenya

Canada

United States

Ireland
XXIII2021–229
Australia

(126 pts)

South Africa

Fiji

Argentina

Ireland

United States
XXIV2022–2311
New Zealand

(200 pts)

Argentina

Fiji

France

Australia

Samoa
XXV2023–248

International sevens

The first international rugby sevens tournament was held in 1973 in Scotland, which was celebrating a century of the Scottish Rugby Union. Seven international teams took part, with England defeating Ireland 22–18 in the final to take the trophy. The Hong Kong Sevens annual tournament began in 1976. Over the next two decades the number of international sevens competitions increased. The most notable was the Rugby World Cup Sevens with Scotland hosting the inaugural event in 1993, along with rugby joining the Commonwealth Games program in 1998.

World Series early years

The first season of the World Sevens Series was the 1999–2000 season. At the Series launch, the chairman of the International Rugby Board, Vernon Pugh, described the IRB’s vision of the role of this new competition: “this competition has set in place another important element in the IRB’s drive to establish rugby as a truly global sport, one with widespread visibility and steadily improving standards of athletic excellence”. New Zealand and Fiji dominated the first series, meeting in the final in eight of the ten season tournaments, and New Zealand narrowly won, overtaking Fiji by winning the last tournament of the series..

New Zealand won the first six seasons in a row from 1999–2000 to 2004–05, led by players such as Karl Te Nana and Amasio Valence. The number of stops in the series varied over the seasons, but experienced a contraction from 11 tournaments in 2001–02 to 7 tournaments in 2002–03 due to the global recession. In the 2005–06 season Fiji clinched the season trophy on the last tournament of the season finishing ahead of England. New Zealand regained the trophy in 2006–07 season in the last tournament of the season.

South Africa was the next team to win the series after taking home the 2008–09 title. In the 2009–10 season, Samoa who finished seventh the previous year shocked the world – led by 2010 top try-scorer and World Rugby Sevens Player of the Year Mikaele Pesamino – by winning four of the last five tournaments to overtake New Zealand and win the series.

Olympic era and professionalism

The number of core teams expanded from 12 to 15 for the 2011–12 series. Qualification for these places was played out at the 2012 Hong Kong SevensCanada (returning to core status for the first time since 2008), Spain and Portugal joined the 12 core teams for the next season. The Japan event also made a return for the first time since 2001 (lasting until 2015). New Zealand continued their dominance by finishing on top.

Argentina was originally planned to begin hosting a tenth event with Mar Del Plata the venue in the 2012–13 season, giving the tour an event on each continent, but when Argentina joined the Rugby Championship those plans were shelved. With the same schedule, New Zealand again were the winners over South Africa. They took it again in 2013–14 with Spain the first team to be relegated after finishing last during that season with Japan replacing them.[citation needed]

Heading into the 2014–15 season, the top four teams qualifying to the 2016 Summer Olympics, with Fiji, South Africa, New Zealand and Great Britain all qualifying through. The 2014–15 season and 2015–16 season were won by Fiji – the first time a team other than New Zealand won back-to-back season titles – led by 2015 and 2016 season Dream Team nominee Osea Kolinisau The two seasons also yielded teams winning their first tournaments – the United States won the 2015 London Sevens to finish the season in sixth overall. Kenya won the 2016 Singapore Sevens, and Scotland won the 2016 London Sevens. Prior to the 2015–16 season World Rugby did a comprehensive review of all nine tournament hosts and adjusted the schedule, dropping two sites (Japan and Scotland), and adding three sites (FranceSingapore and Canada) to the calendar.[citation needed]

In the 2016–17 series, a dominant and consistent display by South Africa saw them reach the finals of the 2016–17 series rounds on eight occasions, winning five of these. As a result, South Africa were series champions with victory in the penultimate round in Paris. The season was a qualifier for the 2018 Rugby World Cup Sevens with the top four teams that had not already qualified, coming from this season.

The teams that made it through to the World Cup via this method were CanadaArgentinaScotland and Samoa.

Best viewed in 1024 x 768 or better
Custom website creation by The Computer Guy Web Design